I have a deep running respect for Italians and their craftsmanship of pasta. Perfectly al dente with each strand of carbohydrate bursting with personality, I gasped upon trying my first plate of true Italian pasta in Rome. 
It’s amazing what Italians can do with minimal ingredients. Just shrimp, garlic, oil, and pasta, that’s it! However, there comes a time when conventions must be put aside, rule and guidelines be damned, and the dam to creativity shattered-that time is called having leftovers.
I had a packet of sadly wilting frisee, zucchini begging to be used, and a packet of edamame so I cut slivers of garlic and tossed it into hot rapeseed oil. Then I let the zucchini dance happily in the garlicky pan and put in the shrimp for a quick minute, just until they turned opaquely coral. 
Next, I removed all the zucchini and shrimp with a slotted spoon and dumped my drained spaghetti noodles in the same pan to soak up all the yum-yums. Save the pasta water particularly if you’re a non-Italian lacking perfect pasta timing. Ladle in pasta water into the pan as needed until the spaghetti reaches your preferred al dente-ness.
Then scatter the toppings back into the pasta and season with salt. Finish it off by tossing in some frisee, edamame, squirt of lemon juice, and a last swirl of oil. Pasta Primavera-buon appetito!

I have a deep running respect for Italians and their craftsmanship of pasta. Perfectly al dente with each strand of carbohydrate bursting with personality, I gasped upon trying my first plate of true Italian pasta in Rome. 

It’s amazing what Italians can do with minimal ingredients. Just shrimp, garlic, oil, and pasta, that’s it! However, there comes a time when conventions must be put aside, rule and guidelines be damned, and the dam to creativity shattered-that time is called having leftovers.

I had a packet of sadly wilting frisee, zucchini begging to be used, and a packet of edamame so I cut slivers of garlic and tossed it into hot rapeseed oil. Then I let the zucchini dance happily in the garlicky pan and put in the shrimp for a quick minute, just until they turned opaquely coral. 

Next, I removed all the zucchini and shrimp with a slotted spoon and dumped my drained spaghetti noodles in the same pan to soak up all the yum-yums. Save the pasta water particularly if you’re a non-Italian lacking perfect pasta timing. Ladle in pasta water into the pan as needed until the spaghetti reaches your preferred al dente-ness.

Then scatter the toppings back into the pasta and season with salt. Finish it off by tossing in some frisee, edamame, squirt of lemon juice, and a last swirl of oil. Pasta Primavera-buon appetito!